Presents results from an evaluation of different models for delivering ITA services, with impacts measured six to eight years after program enrollment.

"This report presents results from an experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of different models for delivering ITA services, with impacts measured six to eight years after program enrollment. The Employment and Training Administration (ETA) at the U.S. Department of Labor designed the ITA experiment to provide federal, state, and local policymakers, administrators, and program managers with information on the tradeoffs inherent in different ITA service delivery models. The experiment tested three models that differed along three dimensions: (1) the ITA award structure, (2) counseling requirements, and (3) staff approval of program choices" (p.1). (Abstractor: Author)

Full publication title: Improving the Effectiveness of Individual Training Accounts: Long-Term Findings From an Experimental Evaluation of Three Service Delivery Models


Major Findings & Recommendations

"The ITA experiment has found that society and customers would benefit greatly from a switch from the predominant Guided Choice model—which offers fixed ITAs and counseling support as customers formulate their training decisions—toward a model that preserves counseling supports but sets more generous caps on ITA awards and customizes them to customer needs. It also finds that such a switch need not be costly to the government as a whole, although it would increase costs for the workforce system. Relative to Guided Choice, the experiment also finds that embracing models that reduce or eliminate training-related counseling requirements and provide more customer flexibility need not be harmful and may be beneficial, especially for dislocated workers. Such a change could also encourage more WIA customers to use ITAs" (p.140). (Abstractor: Author)