Investigates a number of education and training programs involving employers in efforts to help disadvantaged young adults attain post-secondary credentials leading to career track employment.

"Funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, this report investigates a number of education and training programs involving employers in efforts to help disadvantaged young adults attain postsecondary credentials leading to career track employment. Model programs meet four basic criteria:

• Getting low-income youth and young adults postsecondary credentials that will allow them to enter and advance in career track employment.

• Working with employers in industry sectors important to the region’s economy.

• Maximizing employer roles and commitment.

• Demonstrating portability, scalability, and replicability.

We captured the common characteristics across model programs, the key challenges and how they were addressed, and the lessons learned" (p.1). (Abstractor: Author)

Full publication title: Employers, Low-Income Young Adults, and Postsecondary Credentials: A Practical Typology for Business, Education, and Community Leaders


Major Findings & Recommendations

• Programs serving low-income youth face a particular set of challenges, including "the need to make them accountable, to have someone advocate on their behalf, to work around their untraditional schedules, and to give them a sense of belonging" (p.27). • "Coordinating and managing employer involvement can pose hurdles for community-based and social enterprise organizations, as well as community and technical colleges" (p.28). • Community college programs featured in the report depend on the relationships they have with their employers to address the challenges of restructuring to meet labor market demand. "The most ambitious colleges...adopt career pathways as a structural approach to align educational offerings with their region's industry demand" (p.28). • In most cases, intermediaries were created to bridge differences between the private sector employers, government agencies and educational institutions (p. 28-29). (Abstractor: Author and Website Staff)