Suggests strategies to help low-income workers remain employed and advance in the career ladder.
“Most programs focus on helping non-workers get jobs, rather than offering assistance to help low-income workers remain employed and advance up the career ladder. Advancement strategies are more challenging to implement, and the labor market payoff to increased training is not always assured. Experimentation with innovative advancement approaches has shown some to be promising and worth building on and others not to work” (p.1).(Abstractor: Author)

Major Findings & Recommendations

• “Simply offering generic post-employment job coaching, guidance, advice, and training referrals is unlikely to make a difference” (p.1). • “Financial work incentives combined with job coaching and guidance after being placed in a job may strengthen employment retention” (p.1). • “Financial work incentives combined with job coaching and guidance have also shown promise for certain populations receiving housing subsidies” (p.2). • "Increasing participation in training programs does not always produce labor market gains" (p. 2). • "Over the past two decades, sector-focused skills training programs have been implemented to improve employment advancement, but the effectiveness has only been rigorously examined recently" (p. 2). (Abstractor: Author)