Makes the economic case for high-quality Career and Technical Education (CTE), highlights the most important characteristics of CTE programs, and discusses a number of federal and state policies that would encourage the expansion of high-quality CTE.

“High-quality Career and Technical Education (CTE)—as distinguished from older models of vocational education—has great potential to improve student educational attainment and worker earnings, as well as outcomes for firms and the U.S. economy. We began by making the economic case for high-quality CTE, based on the limited number of young Americans who currently achieve four-year college degrees and the relatively weak employment outcomes of most who do not, as well as relatively high job vacancy rates observed for some American firms and sectors. We described the current state of CTE in America, in which overall outcomes have become fairly strong but high variation remains in the quality of programs around the country. We highlighted the most important characteristics of high-quality CTE programs…[and] then discussed a number of federal and state policies that would encourage the expansion of high-quality CTE, along with continuing research and evaluation on their effectiveness” (p.1). (Abstractor: Author)

Full Publication Title: The Promise of High-Quality Career and Technical Education: Improving Outcomes for Students, Firms, and the Economy