Evaluates a US Department of Labor grant aimed at reducing violence in nine schools categorized as “persistently dangerous.”

This report evaluates the first year results from nine “persistently dangerous” schools to examine how they “planned, designed, and implemented programs, interventions, and services under the [Mentoring, Educational, and Employment Strategies to Improve Academic, Social, and Career Pathway Outcomes in Persistently Dangerous Schools Grants] MEES grants” (p. ES-1).

“The central goal of the MEES grants is to reduce violence within these schools by combining mentoring, educational, employment, case management, and violence-prevention strategies for positive school change. The schools are using the grant to restructure themselves in ways that expand the levels of services provided to students and enhance coordination of these services within the schools and their communities” (p.ES-1).

(Abstractor: Author and Website Staff)

Full Publication Title:  Early Implementation Report: Mentoring, Educational, and Employment Strategies (MEES) to Improve Academic, Social and Career Pathway Outcomes in Persistently Dangerous Schools – Generation I

Major Findings & Recommendations

“It is apparent from the first year of grant implementation that grant-funded interventions need time to develop and integrate into the cultures of the schools” (p.ES-12). • “At the close of the first year of grant implementation, there are many signs that schools are on the right track. There is a strong focus at most schools on creating integrated reform (rather than a series of separate programs), enhancing communication and collaboration, improving the quality of the teaching staff, and creating small learning communities and collaborative structures that will outlast the MEES funding stream” (p.ES-12). • “In the first year of grant implementation, schools also made great progress towards deepening buy-in for systemic reform among teachers and parents” (p.ES-12). • “During the first year of implementation, the schools really just came to the precipice of full grant implementation, and measures of school change from the end of SY 2010– 2011 will likely show more of the influences of grant-funded reforms” (p.ES-12). “All of these signs indicate that schools are making steady progress towards achieving the larger goals of the MEES initiative” (p.ES-12). (Abstractor: Author)