Provides a user guide to help workforce organizations understand Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T), and highlights issues to consider when designing or implementing a SNAP E&T component.

“Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T) was instituted in 1985 to help individuals exit SNAP by achieving economic self-sufficiency through work. Each state is required to offer SNAP E&T, which may include services such as job search assistance, work experience, and job training. Well-designed SNAP E&T programs support occupational training and postsecondary education to enable SNAP recipients to acquire the skills necessary to find jobs, increase earnings, and ultimately exit SNAP.

SNAP E&T is one of the only federal programs designed solely to provide targeted employment and training resources to help extremely low-skilled, low-income adults achieve economic self-sufficiency. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2010, nearly 2.6 million individuals participated in SNAP E&T. Nearly 1.5 million used the program to pursue a secondary diploma or GED, while the number of individuals using the program to pursue postsecondary credentials more than doubled between FY 2009 and FY 2010.” (p.1)

“This guide is meant to help the workforce development field better understand Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment & Training (SNAP E&T, formerly Food Stamp Employment & Training or FSET). It provides a basic overview of the program and highlights certain issues that are important to consider when designing or implementing an E&T component. The goal of this publication is to help ensure that SNAP participants have access to high-quality employment and training services that help them gain the necessary skills to obtain stable, family-supporting employment.

It is extremely important that education and training providers interested in providing SNAP E&T services fully understand all state and federal regulations governing the program, as well as any requirements that impact SNAP participants; E&T providers must take care to never unintentionally do something that could impact a SNAP participant’s benefits eligibility. From the beginning, any employment and training provider interested in designing or implementing a SNAP E&T component should work closely with the state agency responsible for administering the SNAP program” (p v).

(Abstractor: Author)


Full publication title: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Employment and Training: Moving Low-Skill SNAP Recipients Toward Self-Sufficiency